Monday, 14 May 2012

Des buts du Dictionnaithe - Dictionary snippets

Lé Dictionnaire Jersiais-Français contcheint un amas d'entrées tchi connaîssent la caûque-souothis ou f'thaient rithe les cats. Dans chutte séthie, j'en présentons en Angliais tchiqu's'eunes d'întéthêt.
A series of out-of-the-ordinary entries translated from the Dictionnaire Jersiais-Français.

malzard, adj. See the noun
n.m. 1. Pot of stoneware or earthenware, with handle, but of fine pottery, containing about a quart and in which one heated cider on the embers. It was not exactly the same thing as a hanapé, q.v. The malzard, probably originally called thus from the name of the manufacturer, was also sometimes made of metal and of conical form to pierce the embers. This sort would have a longer handle, and one would also call it the pointu. See also pînton.
2. The sun, nickname. There is the sun showing itself. This is not always the rising sun, as the Gloss. Jers. states. One says it for example particularly after a shower: There's the sun back again. See périgot. Sun dung - dried cowpat; no doubt called that because the dung is dried by the malzard or sun. I prefer the sun to the cold. As adj. one can say: He is malzard - an early riser.
3. It is also, of course, the name of an ancient Jersey family which still exists. An amusing proverb tells us that: The Malzards and the Hottons are friers of crackling. Jean Malzard's weather, Jean Gouôrré's weather - See weather.

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